September 29, 2022

Weather presenter Tim Davies gave his opinion today on the ongoing furore surrounding the gay pride jersey of the Manly Sea Eagles.

Due to the controversy, seven players threatened to resign from Thursday night’s NRL crunch game against the Roosters after being asked to wear a rainbow-striped jersey, which they objected to on “religious grounds.”

Davies, who is gay and Christian, took a balanced look at the issue in the Today Show newsletter on Wednesday, saying that while he supports the players’ right to “express their feelings,” he also supports the hostility toward pride does not understand. flag.

Today, weather host Tim Davies (pictured) shows his take on the ongoing controversy surrounding the Manly Sea Eagles gay pride jersey

Davies started the newsletter with the irony of a weather presenter discussing a news story about rainbows, a meteorological phenomenon caused by reflection.

He then immediately dived into the subject and explained that he sees the issue from both sides.

“I personally support the players’ right to express their feelings,” he said, before adding that he believes the seven players are “missing the mark.”

He then spoke about his own religious faith and how, in his experience, being a Christian and supporting LGBT rights are not mutually exclusive.

‘I am a christian. As far as I’ve always been taught, the Church promotes inclusiveness and diversity,” Davies wrote.

The former radio host, who went public with his friend last year, also noted that the rainbow of pride “isn’t just about being gay,” it “stands for so much more.”

The former radio host, who went public with his friend last year (pictured together), also noted that the rainbow of pride “isn’t just about being gay,” but “stands for so much more.”

“I think, on a positive note, this issue will help inform more people about it – even after the whistleblowers have sounded full-time tomorrow night,” he concluded.

According to the official Sea Eagles merchandise store, the rainbow-flagged jersey – called Everyone in League – promotes “inclusiveness” in the NRL.

“Sport is one of those beautiful things where people from all walks of life come together and participate in something without exclusion,” the website reads.

Amid the controversy, seven players threatened to resign from Thursday night’s NRL crunch game against the Roosters after being asked to wear a rainbow-striped jersey (pictured on Sean Keppie, Kieran Foran, and Reuben Garrick), which they objected to on’ religious grounds’

“This jersey is a tribute to that and the first of its kind in the NRL.”

The Sea Eagles confirmed on Tuesday that seven players would miss Thursday’s crucial game against the Sydney Roosters because of their convictions, they were unwilling to wear the rainbow stripe club jersey.

Josh Aloiai, Jason Saab, Christian Tuipulotu, Josh Schuster, Haumole Olakau’atu, Tolu Koula and Toafofoa Sipley are the excluded players.

Manly coach Des Hasler (right, with Daly Cherry-Evans) apologized on Tuesday to his own players, the LGBTQI+ community and all 15 other NRL clubs for the pride jersey controversy

The seven, who are all Christians, claim they were caught off guard by the rainbow stripes and only learned of the pride jersey on Monday night.

Manly coach Des Hasler on Tuesday apologized to his own players, the LGBTQI+ community and all 15 other NRL clubs for the pride jersey controversy.

“Our intention was to be caring and compassionate to all the diverse groups who face inclusion challenges on a daily basis,” he said.

“But instead of increasing tolerance and acceptance, we may have hindered this.”

Ian Roberts, who in 1995 became the first-ever rugby league player to come out as gay, said the embarrassing situation will be felt most by the area’s LGBTQI+ community.

“I’m trying to see it from all perspectives, but this breaks my heart,” Roberts told the Daily Telegram.

Ian Roberts (pictured), who in 1995 became the first ever rugby league player to come out as gay, said the embarrassing situation will be felt most by the area’s LGBTQI+ community

“It’s sad and uncomfortable. As an older gay man this is not unknown. I wondered if there would be any religious backlash. That’s why I don’t think the NRL has ever had a Pride round.

“I can promise any young child on the northern beaches who has anything to do with their sexuality would have heard of this.”

Thursday night’s game is a must-win for the ninth-seeded Sea Eagles to keep their hopes of the final alive.

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