October 4, 2022

Lawmakers said they would use August, when Congress takes a long hiatus, to prepare a preliminary report of their findings, expected to be released in September. But a final report — complete with exhibits and transcripts — could wait until December, just before the committee is disbanded at the start of a new congress on January 3, 2023.

Before Thursday’s session, the panel turned to two military veterans — Ms. Luria, a Navy veteran, and Representative Adam Kinzinger, the Illinois Republican and a lieutenant colonel in the Air National Guard — to lead the questioning.

“President Trump has not failed to act during the 187 minutes between leaving the Ellipse and telling the crowd to go home,” Mr Kinzinger said. “He chose not to perform.”

At each of its hearings in June and July, the panel presented evidence that lawmakers believe could be used to bolster a criminal case against Mr Trump. The commission has provided evidence of a conspiracy to defraud the American people and Mr Trump’s own donors; plans to file false voter rolls that could lead to allegations of filing false documents with the government; and evidence of a plot to disrupt the electoral count on Capitol Hill, suggesting he could face charges for obstructing official Congressional proceedings.

Trump’s dereliction of duty may not be the basis for a criminal charge, Ms. Luria said, but it raised ethical, moral and legal questions. At least one judge has cited Mr Trump’s inaction as a reason for further civil lawsuits against Mr Trump.

The commission has spent nearly two months laying out its story about a president who, after failing in a series of attempts to undo his defeat, ordered a crowd of his supporters to march toward the Capitol after he delivered a speech. held in which he called out Mr. Pence for not interfering in the official count of Congressional ballots to elect Joseph R. Biden Jr. to be confirmed as president.

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