October 4, 2022

“I don’t know about you guys”, Johnson said at a Republican luncheon in June 2021. Citing a British climate denier, he said: continued“But I think climate change is, as Lord Monckton said,” and yelled out a barnyard name.

Across the board, the Trump-aligned candidates support redirecting tax dollars toward vouchers, private religious schools, or other forms of “school choice,” as do some Democrats.

But where many of them are moving forward is calling for the abolition of the Federal Ministry of Education. That’s a position taken by none other than Ronald Reagan, so it falls well within the GOP mainstream. But Reagan, of course, failed to do so, despite serving two terms as president — the second after beating his Democratic opponent in a landslide.

In this election, many Republicans have come up with new ways to propose the same concept. For example, Eric Schmitt, the party’s nominee for the Missouri Senate, has floated the idea of ​​disbanding the Department of Education and allocating the money to states in block grants instead.

Don Bolduc, who is seeking the nomination for a New Hampshire Senate seat, has called the Department of Education an “ugly thing” that “must go away.”

At times, candidates have blamed the Department of Education, a historically weak agency that has no real authority over states and local governments, for all sorts of alleged ills.

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